I love this wide-angle aerial shot of lower Manhattan. I copied it from the New York Times. It was created by www.airpano.com.

I love this wide-angle aerial shot of lower Manhattan. I copied it from the New York Times. It was created by www.airpano.com.

 Holy cow! This is the USS Gerald R Ford (CVN-78) in dry dock at the Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Yard in Newport News, Virginia just before it's launching on November 9, 2013. It took 4 years to build this behemoth and as I write this, it is 3 years later and it has not been commissioned yet. This is the first "Ford Class" carrier and will be the US Navy's main carrier type for the rest of my life.

Holy cow! This is the USS Gerald R Ford (CVN-78) in dry dock at the Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Yard in Newport News, Virginia just before it's launching on November 9, 2013. It took 4 years to build this behemoth and as I write this, it is 3 years later and it has not been commissioned yet. This is the first "Ford Class" carrier and will be the US Navy's main carrier type for the rest of my life.

This remarkable photo was taken in April 1975 at the end of the Vietnam war. In Operation Frequent Wind, South Vietnamese helicopter pilots evacuated thousands of people as North Vietnamese troops overran the south. In many cases they would land their helicopters in their own backyards, family and friends would scramble on board and they would use their remaining fuel to land on the nearest American ship. So many of these aircraft were landing on our ships that they had to be pushed overboard to make room for the next landings. It was a poignant end to a horrible war. What I find most striking about this photo is how the men's reaching arms and the lines of the tipping Huey are reminiscent of the most famous war photograph of all - Joe Rosenthal's flag raising on Iwo Jima, thirty years earlier - one an image of triumph, the other of failure.

   Lt. Col. Robert Wolverton, C/O 3 Btn, 506 Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, checking his gear before boarding the C-47 "Dakota", 8Y-S, "Stoy Hora" of the 440th Troop Carrier Squadron at an airfield in Exeter, England.   The evening of the 5th of June 1944.    On that evening in June 1944, he gathered his men in an orchard adjacent to what is now Exeter airport, and said:    "Men, I am not a religious man and I don't know your feelings in this matter, but I am going to ask you to pray with me for the success of the mission before us. And while we pray, let us get on our knees and not look down but up with faces raised to the sky so that we can see God and ask his blessing in what we are about to do.      "God almighty, in a few short hours we will be in battle with the enemy. We do not join battle afraid. We do not ask favors or indulgence but ask that, if You will, use us as Your instrument for the right and an aid in returning peace to the world.  "We do not know or seek what our fate will be. We ask only this, that if die we must, that we die as men would die, without complaining, without pleading and safe in the feeling that we have done our best for what we believed was right.  "Oh Lord, protect our loved ones and be near us in the fire ahead and with us now as we pray to you."  Sadly, within hours, the orator himself was dead; a cruel twist of fate meant his feet never touched French soil.  Lt Col Robert L Wolverton (aged 30), was killed by ground fire and left suspended by his parachute from an apple tree in an orchard just north of the hamlet of St Côme du Mont in Normandy.  (Nb. of the 15 men in his 'stick', 5 were KIA on D/Day, 8 taken as POWs and 2 unaccounted for)   (Colourised by Johhny Sirlande from Belgium)   

Lt. Col. Robert Wolverton, C/O 3 Btn, 506 Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, checking his gear before boarding the C-47 "Dakota", 8Y-S, "Stoy Hora" of the 440th Troop Carrier Squadron at an airfield in Exeter, England. The evening of the 5th of June 1944.  On that evening in June 1944, he gathered his men in an orchard adjacent to what is now Exeter airport, and said:

"Men, I am not a religious man and I don't know your feelings in this matter, but I am going to ask you to pray with me for the success of the mission before us. And while we pray, let us get on our knees and not look down but up with faces raised to the sky so that we can see God and ask his blessing in what we are about to do.

"God almighty, in a few short hours we will be in battle with the enemy. We do not join battle afraid. We do not ask favors or indulgence but ask that, if You will, use us as Your instrument for the right and an aid in returning peace to the world.

"We do not know or seek what our fate will be. We ask only this, that if die we must, that we die as men would die, without complaining, without pleading and safe in the feeling that we have done our best for what we believed was right.

"Oh Lord, protect our loved ones and be near us in the fire ahead and with us now as we pray to you."

Sadly, within hours, the orator himself was dead; a cruel twist of fate meant his feet never touched French soil.  Lt Col Robert L Wolverton (aged 30), was killed by ground fire and left suspended by his parachute from an apple tree in an orchard just north of the hamlet of St Côme du Mont in Normandy.

(Nb. of the 15 men in his 'stick', 5 were KIA on D/Day, 8 taken as POWs and 2 unaccounted for)


(Colourised by Johhny Sirlande from Belgium)

 

  This actually circulated two years BEFORE the historic Supreme Court ruling

This actually circulated two years BEFORE the historic Supreme Court ruling

  Look into the eyes of this 18 year old US Marine. He's being evacuated from an island in the Pacific where he has been fighting the Japanese during World War II. He's exhausted and dirty and has spent weeks in hell for you and me. He'll die on his next landing in a few weeks. His name was Theodore James MIller.

Look into the eyes of this 18 year old US Marine. He's being evacuated from an island in the Pacific where he has been fighting the Japanese during World War II. He's exhausted and dirty and has spent weeks in hell for you and me. He'll die on his next landing in a few weeks. His name was Theodore James MIller.

  You're looking south here where Broadway and 7th Avenue intersect. On top of this building today is the famous Ball that is dropped on New Year's Eve. We call it Times Square now because of this building - the original New York Times building! Before this, it was called Longacre Square.

You're looking south here where Broadway and 7th Avenue intersect. On top of this building today is the famous Ball that is dropped on New Year's Eve. We call it Times Square now because of this building - the original New York Times building! Before this, it was called Longacre Square.

  Near the end of World War II in a devastated German town, two soldiers huddle under the cover of a US Sherman tank perhaps getting some warmth from it's engine in the cold winter of 1944-5. One cradles a Thompson submachine gun cocked and ready in his lap. As in so many photos of the era, they wear their helmets tipped coolly to one side, and cigarettes from their C Ration kits dangle from their lips.

Near the end of World War II in a devastated German town, two soldiers huddle under the cover of a US Sherman tank perhaps getting some warmth from it's engine in the cold winter of 1944-5. One cradles a Thompson submachine gun cocked and ready in his lap. As in so many photos of the era, they wear their helmets tipped coolly to one side, and cigarettes from their C Ration kits dangle from their lips.

  I love this picture. Jorge Posada with his arm around Yogi Berra. Even without the numbers, both famous Yankee catchers are unmistakable.

I love this picture. Jorge Posada with his arm around Yogi Berra. Even without the numbers, both famous Yankee catchers are unmistakable.